Posted in Current events & community, Employment/jobs, Identity/healing the past, Life, Love/relationships

Overcoming personality 

I’m trying to be alert to the need not to glorify or belittle someone else’s personality. Sure there are some people that we get along with more than others, but looking deeply to see the spiritual nature — the God bestowed nature that includes an inexhaustible list of spiritual qualities — is helping me perceive divine reality. The actual spiritual substance that is underlying being. 

For instance, if someone is sick, I can see that person spiritually as whole, poised, receptive, loving, at one with God and including all right ideas from God, while tending to their human need with compassion and humility. 

Jesus beheld in Science the perfect man, who appeared to him where sinning mortal man appears to mortals. In this perfect man the Saviour saw God’s own likeness, and this correct view of man healed the sick. Thus Jesus taught that the kingdom of God is intact, universal, and that man is pure and holy.*

This spiritual perspective heals.  

This can be helpful in an office setting as well. That horrible boss is actually God’s spiritual, valuable, loved and loving child. He or she is the embodiment of light. Discerning even one good thing, one quality such as compassion toward their family or honesty with their colleagues, can heal the situation because it melts the suggestions of evil that say that all is material and limited. 

This is absolutely helpful in looking at political leaders. That great act didn’t come from that particular person; it came from God giving the right idea — expressing Himself — to the people so that it would be a blessing to the community. 

Giving the credit to God helps me realize everyone’s innate Christly nature and capacity to be receptive to the ideas and messages coming to them from God. I can recognize that we all have the power to listen to God and that we don’t have to fear because it is our Father’s good pleasure to give us the Kingdom (Luke 12:32). 

All of us can recognize the Kingdom within (Luke 17:21) and work together effectively to see that.
Let’s rejoice!

Mary Baker Eddy, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, p. 477 

Posted in Current events & community, Parenting/Father Mother God

Does force do us any good?

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I was reading a news article in which one leader of a country was saying the only way to accomplish its goals was required through force.

I questioned this conclusion. Really…is the only way to accomplish something through force? Has any good thing every been accomplished by human force? We can’t force the sun to rise or set; we can’t force a flower to open; we can’t force a baby to go to sleep.

In fact, I would say that we can’t really “force” any thing good to happen. There is the old Christian sentiment: Let go and let God.

God is the force, will and love the causes things to happen. This force of good is always active, always present and is always working for the benefit of everyone. We can’t make it happen; it is already happening; we are simply a witness to this fact (witnessing isn’t a passive thing; it is actively seeing the facts of spiritual reality — the truth about God and man’s relationship).

Here’s an example: I was trying to put our baby down, but he just wasn’t going to sleep. I was really trying to make it happen (this rocking will be soothing!). He immediately did fall asleep, though, when I changed my thinking — when I witnessed the harmony of that moment. What could I be doing during that time? Praying! I had some praying to do, so I decided that was as good of a time as any, I’d better get started. He fell asleep right away. The truth about that moment was that I have a purpose and so does he. Our purpose’s can not interfere or take away from one another. And they didn’t!

I couldn’t force him to go to sleep, but I could be a witness to the spiritual facts of that moment: all is harmonious, all is peaceful, complete, and we are not deprived of anything (since divine Love supplies all).

Perhaps these leaders may have had to put a baby down to sleep at one time. Maybe they can then recognize that the same tenderness, patience and gentleness is required in their relations to others.