Posted in Bible, Life, Mental health/wellness, Time/stress

A practical guide for living

How often do you read the Sermon on the Mount? The founder of my church recommends reading it once a week and putting it in to practice each day. I have to admit that I rarely read it every week, but I do have to say that I notice a profound difference in my outlook on life when I do read it. The Sermon on the Mount, Matthew 5-7, has a profound way of spiritualizing thought, the way we live, and our interactions with others. Starting out with the beatitudes highlights attributes such as humbleness, meekness, gentleness, sincerity, peacemaking, and more. Later on it illustrates the importance of not judging others, not criticizing others, and even not worrying because God gives you what you need. It reminds us of God’s great love, and it encourages us to let God’s light shine! And it assures us that following this teaching gives us a house, consciousness, and faith that is built on a rock.

I am amazed by the simplicity and profound nature of this Sermon. It has the power to transform hearts and lives. So, if it’s been a little while, find your favorite translation of the Bible and give it a read today. It will surely re-orient your thinking and life in a positive way.

To my sense the Sermon on the Mount, read each Sunday without comment and obeyed throughout the week, would be enough for Christian practice. The Word of God is a powerful preacher, and it is not too spiritual to be practical, nor too transcendental to be heard and understood.–Mary Baker Eddy

PS — Check out a friend’s article on how living the principles of the Sermon on the Mount can even lead us to a less violent world. Universal Love: Roadmap to a less violent world


Image by thatsphotography from Pixabay

Posted in Future/stability/security, Life, Love/relationships

3 ways to experience God’s love

Aren’t we all seeking a little (or a lot) more of God’s love? Don’t we, and the world, all want to experience unconditional love? A love that doesn’t judge. A love that embraces you and everyone all the time. Wouldn’t that be great? Here are 3 ways to experience more of God’s love in your life:

Be a transparency.
Each of us can experience God’s love by being a transparency for that love. Just like the glass in a window is warm when the sun shines through it, so radiating God’s love to those around you can warm and bless you! You will feel loved when doing so!

Hope.
Hope is the marriage between the consciousness of good and the expectancy of good. Expect good! This is your natural state. Don’t expect evil, sickness or fear. Focus on the good in your experience right now. This expectancy and awareness of good is a natural defense to the door of your thought and your life.

Gratitude.
Being grateful is a huge part of feeling God’s love. Counting our blessings helps assure us of the continuity of good. It assures us of the presence of good and fills our thought with joy! Give gratitude, give thanks, even in times of affliction, for all the strength, courage and grace that God is loving you with and giving you each moment.

We are all so loved and can shine it!

Today is the first day of my new blogging project. I will be blogging everyday going forward as a new way to give thanks to God and be conscious of God’s  loving relationship with humanity. I hope these posts will bless and inspire you, as they do for me when I’m writing them. Thanks for keeping up with my blog! 

 

 

Posted in Guest blogs/reposts, Life, Love/relationships

Repost: Communication

This blog post by “Daring to live in love! The alternate economy” has some great ideas and guidelines for communication.

Week 8: COMMUNICATION — No blah blah.

Is it kind?

Think: Gossip. Building yourself up at someone else’s expense. Mean-spirited, oppressive put downs. Spreading rumors.

Is it necessary?

‘Unnecessary’ would include: Talking just to hear yourself talk. Trying to always have the last word. Bragging. Meaning to shock others. Self-indulgent blah blah.

Is it true?

Obvious, right? Lying. Misrepresenting. Tearing down your opponent. Demonizing ‘the other’.

Does it improve upon the silence?

There are times when it’s not possible to be better than simply silent: Being ‘present’ to someone dying, or in pain. Holding someone’s confidence. Refraining when in emotional turmoil. Not rising to the bait. Considering: Do I really know what’s best??