I was always there

Sometimes finding a solution to a problem can take a while. It may require patience, persistent prayer and not giving up.

But God is right here guiding us; He always been and always will be. Sometimes we don’t see it until later. It reminds me of the scene with Humpty Dumpty in the movie Puss in Boots — except not in a creepy way, but in a good way!

http://bit.ly/15Tsh1m

Praying about global issues today (hungry children, young girls living on the streets and environmental issues) showed me that God is embracing each one of these dear people and is eradicating these troublesome issues. God’s will for each one is peace, harmony and perfection.

“Father-Mother is the name for Deity, which indicates His tender relationship to His spiritual creation.” (Mary Baker Eddy, Science and Health, p.332)

“Is there anyone among you who, if your child asks for bread, will give a stone? …. If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father in heaven give good things to those who ask him!” (Matthew 7:7-11 NRSV)

Yes, seeing the complete resolution of these issues may take some time. But prayer does make a difference, and as we each open our thought to seeing results from our prayers, we will experience blessings that make a difference every day.

Reblog: Counteracting hate

This article really helps me see how to pray about the global issues that are happening.

Counteracting hate

A Christian Science perspective: When different groups of people are accused of hate and intolerance, and violence erupts, how can prayer contribute to healing?

By Melanie Hahn Ball  (Reblogged from CSMonitor.com)

What can dedicated spiritual thinkers do to uncover and repudiate the underlying cause of violence? Recent events in Libya, Egypt, Tunisia, and Yemen have prompted many questions regarding security, hate speech, and religious tolerance….

Mary Baker Eddy, who discovered Christian Science, offers clear, intelligent ideas on how to focus our prayers during times of upheaval and violence. Comparing malicious hatred to a serpent, she described what motivates violent acts not as individuals but as evil – masking itself as person, place, or cause. She wrote: “The serpentine form stands for subtlety, winding its way amidst all evil, but doing this in the name of good…. It is the animal instinct in mortals, which would impel them to devour each other….

“This malicious animal instinct, … incites mortals to kill morally and physically even their fellow-mortals, and worse still, to charge the innocent with the crime” (Science and Health with Key to the Scripturespp. 563-564). Read more