Posted in Guest blogs/reposts, Life, Mental health/wellness, Prayer/healing, Supply, Self-Worth, Finances, Time/stress

Reblog: Garden of Gratitude

It’s so easy to get caught up in focusing on the negative, or all the things “wrong” around us. This blog post illustrates how valuable it is to get caught up in the good around us, instead.

 

Garden of Gratitude

by Patrick Collins

…He told me that on his morning trip next door four days after he began ‘deadheading”, as he gazed at the pots he noticed how brilliant and colorful the geraniums were. He suddenly realized that he had spent the first part of the week focusing on the dead flowers, looking intently for the “dead and gone” and what he could “bury”.   He realized that he had overlooked the beauty of the entire garden, and each individual plant by looking for death instead of life. He became incredibly GRATEFUL for life and being. Read more

Posted in Childlike, Guest blogs/reposts, Health/wellness, Mental health/wellness, Parenting/Father Mother God

Reblog: Grateful teens

from CSMonitor.com

It’s not about the money.

A recent study focused on the effect of gratitude on teenagers. There are a lot of reasons teens are grateful. And being rich isn’t necessarily one of them. Similarly, there are plenty of reasons teens might act as if they had a gratitude deficit. Being poor doesn’t necessarily seem to be one of them.

The study suggests that regardless of a teenager’s socioeconomic background, he or she can experience the benefits of a grateful heart, including the benefit of better mental health. Through a few changes in outlook, attitude, and behavior, he or she can make big gains on the gratitude front. Teens who are the most grateful find a number of benefits multiplying. Such as? Things like improved academic performance, a sense of purpose, more hope, and more happiness. As these take root, they grow more common to a teen’s outlook and more natural to his or her life. On the flip side, things like hopelessness or depression – which are at times linked to suicide in teens – grow less prevalent. Read more